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Gjetost Friday

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As a follow-up to the last post and after a long stressful week, it’s such a pleasure to relax with a killer cheese etc. arrangement and a nice glass of wine for dinner:

All the Major Food Groups

Bottom Left Clockwise: Gjetost (or Brunost for those overseas), Tomato (obvs), Lindt really effing dark chocolate (85%), Wasa Sourdough Rye Crackers, and Camembert.

On a similar topic, if you haven’t tried Gjetost/Brunost, go buy some. It is a delicious cheese from Norway (translation: goat cheese/brown cheese) made from the whey of goat’s milk (interestingly, Ricotta is another cheese made from whey, but has completely different characteristics). It has a lovely caramel flavor with a hint of goat, the caramel coming into existence from when the whey is heated and the lactose reacts with the whey protein. It’s also quite dense and creamy, which makes it best friends with a tiny piece of chocolate. Check here: http://cheesemongerswife.wordpress.com/2009/04/17/gjetost-you-either-love-it-or-you-hate-it/ for a more detailed breakdown.

PS. Cheese has been shown to prevent tooth decay due to the bacteria that adhere to teeth after eating, another reason why it is a perfect and irreplaceable end to a meal…

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“A Dinner Which Ends Without Cheese is like a Beautiful Woman With Only One Eye”

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A Christmas present I am quite excited to immerse myself in…

An 1825 Masterpiece

Aphorisms of the professor include:

the famous “Tell me what you eat and I shall tell you what you are”

“The discovery of a new dish does more for human happiness than the discovery of a star”

“To invite people to dine with us is to make ourselves responsible for their well-being for as long as they are under our roofs”

And less favourably:

“Men who stuff themselves and grow tipsy know neither how to eat nor how to drink”

Can’t wait to see what other interesting tidbits Brillat-Savarin comes up with.

To be continued…

Infuse Your Booze

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A trip to Seattle this summer introduced me to lapsang tea, a love-it-or-hate-it type of black tea that has been smoked over a pine fire to give it a characteristic smoky flavour. I loved it and purchased some immediately for return to Vancouver. After having sampled its delights, it occurred to me that this could be a very simple way to add that smoky-peaty flavor I love to my favorite bourbon.

With very little practical knowledge of infusions other than that gleaned from the internet and a working knowledge of chemistry/biology, I determined there could be a few barriers to a perfect product. I would have to guesstimate an appropriate amount of tea to add to an appropriate amount of bourbon, and I would have to ensure not to leave it too long risking co-infusion of the bitter tannins. After quizzing a friend who had made me anise-infused gin and lavender-infused gin as a Christmas present (see: http://surladerive.tumblr.com/), I settled on the recipe that follows:

Lapsang-Infused Bourbon

1 tbsp lapsang tea

1 cup Bulleit bourbon

Infuse 10 minutes, strain with a fine sieve.

It turned out quite delicious with a mild smoke finish and what seems to be an intensified burn compared to the uninfused bourbon. It had just a hint of bitterness so any longer infusion would likely be too much. It also deepened the color from honey-brown to more of an Amber-brown. I am contemplating doing another infusion to intensify the smokeyness, try to emulate the peated Connemara whiskey I picked up in Ireland this summer, and be able to drink smoky Manhattans again. In the future, I would likely just double the amount of tea I use in my first infusion.

The best part of the whole experience was definitely deciding how to put everything together in a cocktail (especially with my limited bar for my time here in Prince George):

Smoky Mandarin Bourbonade

Smoky Orange Bourbonade

1.5 oz Bulleit bourbon

Juice of 1 mandarin Orange

3/4 tsp simple syrup

On a brief note, I also tried a similar infusion with Earl Grey tea to similarly delicious results.

Earl Grey Sour

1 oz Earl Grey Infused Bourbon

1/2 oz lemon juice

2 dashes Fees Brothers lemon bitters

1.5 tsp simple syrup

flamed lemon peel for garnish

Now that my brain has latched on to the idea of tea infusions, it seems the possibilities are endless……

This Season’s Wiser’s Ad

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Pairs well with pieces of all animals!

Thanksgiving Leftover Breakfast: The Benedict

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Really happy about this right now:


The best thing since an egg smothered in anything.

 

A treat for the taste buds that was super easy to make: Piece of toast, sliced turkey leftover, a dollop or two of cranberry sauce, a poached egg, and all covered in delicious turkey gravy. Voilà. Such a wonderful combination, I’m not sure why it didn’t happen earlier in my life.

Proof That Whiskey Actually Makes my Cold Better.

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My winter supply

I am sick. In an attempt to cure the itchy-burny feeling at the back of my throat and send any associated bacteria/viruses straight to hell, I purchased a bottle of Jameson Irish Whiskey. I have long speculated that regular intake of alcoholic beverages (particularly spirits due to their high alcohol content) helps to kill any viruses and bacteria that are hanging out in the oral passages, just waiting to explode into a full-blown cold. By this rationale, swigging whiskey with a sore throat would be a more palatable version of using an sanitizing swab on your mouth and throat, in addition to bonus effects of relaxation and pain-killing.

Cold medicine has never tasted so good.


Looks like Fall is going to be fun.

In an effort to make my claim as legit as possible, I managed to find a study from the American Journal of Public Health

that so eloquently states: “Greater numbers of alcoholic drinks (up to three or four per day) were associated with decreased risk for developing colds because drinking [alcohol] was associated with decreased illness following infection”. This constitutes ‘Score One’ for me, and may also explain why I was able to remain infection-free for most of my 19+ life. The best part comes when they describe the afore-mentioned “three or four [alcoholic] drinks per day” as moderate drinking, causing my self- and society-imposed guilt of wanting to enjoy 3-4 alcoholic drinks every day to diminish. ‘Score Two’ for me.

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